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  1. The Financial Risks of Climate Change

    The U.S. municipal market has always faced credit exposure to weather-related and natural catastrophes – such as fires, hurricanes, floods and earthquakes.However, what were previously viewed as one-off implications for creditworthiness – transitory storms, for example – can increasingly be analyzed through the lens of climate change risk. As such, there are possible risks faced by U.S. municipal issuers as a result of a rapidly changing climate.
  2. Restoring a Lost Corridor

    There is only one obstacle standing between the college town of Laramie, Wyo., and the year-round recreational opportunities of the Medicine Bow National Forest just to the east.That obstacle is a spread of 5,528 acres of privately owned land, sloping uphill from the edge of Laramie to what is known as Pilot Hill, which also happens to stand atop a portion of the Casper Aquifer, the main water supply for Laramie and the surrounding area.
  3. COP23: Two Degrees, With Separation

    In contrast to the euphoric Paris conference of 2015, where 195 countries agreed to limit global warming below two degrees Celsius, the 2017 United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP23) in Bonn, Germany was a more subdued event.After a year of multiple extreme weather events around the world, some delegations expressed their growing sense of urgency for action, particularly the small island states and developing countries looking to focus more attention on climate change adaptation.
  4. Plan Now for Supporting Pollinators

    It is late December, the days are short, the temperatures chilly, and in much of the country plants and insects are dormant or headed south.But to make sure they keep coming back, now is the time to start thinking about creating a robust environment for pollinators, said Phyllis Stiles, founder and director of Bee City USA and Bee Campus USA.
  5. Personal Care Products & Pharmaceuticals Impact Aquatic Life

    MILLBROOK, N.Y. -- Traditional toxicity testing underestimates the risk that pharmaceutical and personal care product pollution poses to freshwater ecosystems.Criteria that account for ecological disruption – not just organism death – are needed to protect surface waters, which are under pressure from a growing population and escalating synthetic chemical use. So reports a new study published recently in Elementa.
  6. EPA Continues Transformation Under Trump Administration

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has released its "final report" on how it plans to implement President Trump’s executive order curbing environmental regulations in order to promote energy production and economic growth.Required by law to issue a request for public comments when considering changes to environmental regulations, the EPA reported receiving more than 460,000 comments, including a record-breaking 63,346 individual responses.
  7. Red County, Blue City Work Together on Climate Resilience

    The Greater Kansas City area is known for the state line that divides its two metropolitan parts between Kansas and Missouri. There are many other borders: county lines, city limits and political stripes.It’s the latter that makes action around climate resilience seem insurmountable at times, but a coalition has come together to develop a strategy.
  8. How Chemistry Shapes the Local Environment

    MILLBROOK, N.Y. – Through a $1.2 million grant from the National Science Foundation, the Baltimore Ecosystem Study (BES) is partnering with Baltimore City Public Schools to transform the way that chemistry is taught in the city’s high schools.The innovative approach draws on data gathered by BES to convey how chemistry shapes the local environment.
  9. Ecologists Track Deadly Fish Virus in Pacific Northwest

    Pacific salmon and trout are vulnerable to infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), a pathogen that can be lethal to juvenile fish.A recent Ecology and Evolution study is the first to explore how IHNV spreads among juvenile hatchery-raised fish in the Pacific Northwest, where high rates of infection and mortality can occur.
  10. Organic Growth: More Farms Transitioning in Iowa, Illinois, Wisconsin

    CASCADE, Iowa — Kim and Marvin Lynch’s dairy farm in Cascade was certified as organic in 2009, but the process wasn’t easy.The Lynches had to discontinue using fertilizers, insecticides and synthetic herbicides in the fields of their third-generation farm for three years before it could be certified. Their cows could no longer be given a regular regimen of antibiotics.
  11. Study Finds Poor Neighborhoods Have More Mosquitoes

    MILLBROOK, N.Y. - A new study published in the Journal of Medical Entomology reports that in Baltimore neighborhoods with high levels of residential abandonment are hotspots for tiger mosquitoes (Aedes albopictus).This environmental injustice may leave low-income urban residents more vulnerable to mosquito-borne disease.
  12. Bitter Reaction as Trump Bails on Climate Accord

    The sustainability community erupted with nearly universal dismay, outrage and resolve in the face of President Donald Trump’s decision to pull the United States out of the Paris climate agreement late last week. But few were really surprised.After all, Trump was merely making good on another campaign promise, pitting his administration against the 71 percent of U.S. citizens who believe climate change is a clear and present danger, and joining only the countries of Syria and Nicaragua in defiance of the accord, which was signed by nearly 200 nations.

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